1937 Ford Woody Is a Surfer’s Wet Dream

23 Juli 2020 - autoevolution

1937 Ford Woody Is a Surfer’s Wet Dream

For one reason or another, we imagine surfers going to the beach in Jeeps rather than anything else.

But we guess hot rods would do the job just fine too, even if they come with a partially odd, wooden body.

Wood used in cars is not something new. We presently get to see the material adorning the insides of high-end, luxury machines, as a touch of warmth and exclusivity, but there was a time when everybody could have had a car with wood elements. Oddly enough, the wood was also used on the outside.

They were called woodies, and made the rounds on American streets mostly in the 1950s and 1960s. The fact that most of the panels were made this way, coupled with the fact that they came mostly shaped as station wagons, make them look strange to the modern onlooker.

We're not quite sure where we stand with this 1937 Ford Woody, though. It looks just as funky as the station wagons of old, but there are little details that add some more vibe to it, including on the roof, which clearly gives it a higher purpose than to serve the needs of a suburban family: a surf board.

For some reason, the garage behind this build thought it would be great for someone to show up at the beach in this thing, get out of the car, take the surfboard from the roof and go for a wet adventure.

The hot rod, as it's described on the website where it is selling (the price is $38,500) was completed four years ago as a ground-up build. It's made from a square tube chassis with a 1937 Ford front end, and a body mixing wood with aluminum.

Under the hood the builders fit a 383ci (6.3-liters) stroker V8 tied to TH400 automatic transmission that in turn is linked to a GM 10-bolt rear end with 3.73 gears.

The interior continues the use of wood, seen on the door panels, steering wheel and dashboard. There are two bucket seats up front and a bench seat in the rear, allowing for up to five people to ride in style on their way to the beach.

The Ford has barely been used since it was completed, as the odometer shows only a little over 4,200 miles.