This 1989 Porsche 930 Turbo Convertible Is a Rare Widowmaker

28 Septembre 2020 - autoevolution

This 1989 Porsche 930 Turbo Convertible Is a Rare Widowmaker

Porsche’s turbocharging legacy started with racing cars, and by the middle of the 1970s, the Neunelfer received a snail as well.

The 930 was the fastest production car in Germany when it was introduced, and the force-fed model soldiered on for 14 years until the 964 Turbo took over with minimal revisions to the flat-six engine.

This black beauty here is one of the final units ever produced, a 930 "with the magic letter K in the chassis number." This identifies the widowmaker in the photo gallery as one of 844 turbo convertibles with the G50 five-speed manual transmission and the 467th of 600 U.S. models according to the selling dealership.

DLS Automobile didn't list an asking price for this blast from the past, but it does mention that the open-top Porker spent almost 20 years in Ohio, Florida, and New York under previous ownership. The car was involved in an accident in Staten Island in 2011, after which the 930 Turbo Convertible was exported to Germany.

Despite the damage, the current owner reconditioned the car to perfection with the help of air-cooled Porsche specialist Grenzlandring Motors. Repainted in the original color (paint code L700), the overhauling process also boasts a Sonnenland soft top, new tires, black leather for the dashboard, and EU-spec metric gauges.

January 2016 is when the no-expense-spared restoration came to an end, and shortly after that, the owner has detailed the German sports car with paint, interior, and undercarriage protection. The steering wheel and radio are said to be original.

DLS doesn't have all documentation and receipts of the 1989 Porsche 930 Turbo Convertible, but the numbers match and the condition of the vehicle speaks for itself. To this effect, it's easy to understand why the dealer hasn't listed the price.

The 3.3-liter boxer hanging over the rear axle is good for 286 PS, translating to 282 horsepower in American currency. In this application, that's good enough for 100 kph (62 miles per hour) in 5.2 seconds and a top speed of 260 kph (162 mph).